Vatican elevates the perception that the Pope isn’t human

Why are Catholics obsessed with this man? I don’t know. Someone who leads a church, I understand, may be hailed as especially righteous. But the faithful seem to need to make the guy an accessory god, supreme in his own right.

Pope’s organs are too holy to donate to mortals, says Church
By Michael Day | 5 February 2011 | The Independent

. . as recently as 2008, three years after being elected pontiff, Benedict attended an international congress on donor transplantation where he repeated his support for organ donors. “It’s a special way of showing charity,” he said, though he added that donations had to be “free, voluntary [and] respectful of the health and dignity of the donor”.

Mgr Gaenswein did not specify why the Pope is not able to donate his organs. But Archbishop Zymunt Zimowski, a member of the Vatican health council, said it was because the body of the Pope effectively belonged to the entire Catholic Church. “It’s understandable that the body of the Pontiff should rest intact because, in his role as successor to Saint Paul and universal pastor of the Catholic Church, he belongs entirely to the Church in spirit and body,” he told La Repubblica.

Why must the guy be extra-mortal? If he’s seen as a regular person, does that make God less real? Less likely? Less exciting? More remote? If anything, having an ersatz God On Earth makes the possibility of God suspect. You say your Supreme Being and the Supreme Morals Guy, who intervened to retain a child molester in The Church, are para-worldly fluent in righteousness? Say, brother, might God’s return invoke a Boy Scout brothel? Can you tell me why so many Popes have been extremely human human beings?

Stephen VII (Pope from 896 – 897)

Stephen’s sworn enemy was his predecessor to the Fisherman’s Ring, Formosus. Whatever Formosus had done to so enrage his successor isn’t completely clear, but dear Pope Stephen had his dead body dug up and put on trial for “coveting the papal throne.” Being found guilty (of course), the deceased was stripped, had its 3 fingers, used for bestowing blessings, cut off, and the body dumped in the Tiber River. Stephen got his, though. He was later imprisoned and strangled to death.

And yet Papal Infallibility is still Church doctrine. Ignore his shitty life, have faith in his cryptic relationship with a bold God. Whatever he pronounces on dogma, it’s perfection.

Alexander VI (Pope from 1492 – 1503)

He bribed his way to St. Peter’s – appointing anyone he could get in his pocket to cardinal to vote for him. Continuing on the family tradition, he also appointed his son and the teenage brother of his mistress as cardinals (strength in numbers you know). While enjoying the office of pope he also enjoyed an active sex life, was suspected of arranging murders of his rivals and indulging in orgies (hey, when in Rome…) and managed to father seven children. Being a model father of the times, his poor daughter, Lucrezia, got married off three times to help build alliances and when one of those marriage alliances went sour (to a guy she really liked), the pope/daddy/evil father-in-law had him stabbed to death.

So, at best, they’re only occasionally in touch with the godhead. The no-transplant rule prevents a particularly Earthly snafu, I’m betting. If some surgeon puts His Liver in a guy who goes on to be a rapist or murderer, it spells the end of The Pope as a magical being. Which, of course, he isn’t. But the global illusion is too important.

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2 thoughts Vatican elevates the perception that the Pope isn’t human

  1. avatar bjkeefe says:

    Can you imagine the PR kerfuffle if someone’s body rejected the pope’s organ?

    And by kerfuffle, I mean hilarity, of course.

  2. avatar toma says:

    I wish I’d imagined it, credit to you. That would be funny. And by funny, I mean tragic, because that’s all I’m willing to admit. Actually, if His kidney got transplanted into a Muslim guy and it ended up killing him, that would be the funniest thing evar. And the beginning of World War III.

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